Seminalplasmin, fertility and AIDS

| March 22, 2015 | 0 Comments

P M BHARGAVA

Published in: Experimental Cell Research, 1962, 27, 453-467.

Abstract:

Seminalplasmin, a 47-aminoacid-long protein discovered in our laboratory, is a potent inhibitor of bacterial growth. At high concentrations, it is bacteriocidal, and at even higher concentrations it lyses bacterial cells; lysis-resistant mutants of E. coli have been obtained and mapped by transduction. It also lyses certain mammalian cells. It kills a wide variety of microbes-grampositive and gram-negative bacteria and yeasts-by entering the cell and inhibiting RNA polymerases, for examples, from E. coli and yeast, and reverse transcriptases, by binding strongly to the enzyme. It binds to DNA and unwinds it. Seminalplasmin which is secreted by the accessory sex glands of bull but not by testes or epididymis, also influences spermatozoal functions. It binds to the plasma and acrosomal membranes of the spermatozoa and, as a consequence, brings about an increase in the fluidity of the membranes. Such changes are known to influence the acrosome reaction and fertilising ability of seminalplasmin. In fact, seminalplasmin inhibits the motility, acrosome reaction and fertilising ability of mammalian spermatozoa in vitro. In rats, it also inhibits in vivo fertilisation. Seminalplasmin also binds to DNA strongly and unwinds it.

HOW TO CITE

Seminalplasmin, fertility and AIDS. P M BHARGAVA. Proceedings of Indian National Science Academy, 1990, B56(3), 241-244.

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